Programs & Services

Boating Regulations

Life Jackets

LIFE JACKET FACTS

Life Jackets Save Lives AdMost boaters know they are required to have a U.S. Coast Guard-approved wearable life jacket for every person on their boat. State Parks recommends that all boaters and passengers always wear a life jacket while boating. Accidents on the water can happen much too fast to put on a life jacket. The major cause of all boating related deaths is drowning—and most drowning victims were not wearing a life jacket.

The good news is that today’s life jackets are much more comfortable, lightweight, and stylish than the bulky orange style most boaters know. Life jackets that use inflatable technologies are cool and comfortable. They may resemble a pair of suspenders or a belt pack. Many inflate automatically when immersed in water.

IT’S THE LAW

  • All vessels must have at least one USCG-approved wearable life jacket for each person on board.
  • All vessels (except for personal watercraft, canoes, kayaks, paddleboards, and rubber rafts) must have one  USCG-approved throwable personal flotation device on board.
  • Every person on board a personal watercraft must wear a USCG-approved life jacket.
  • Every person on board a canoe, kayak, paddleboard, or rubber raft must wear a USCG-approved life jacket.
  • Every person using a wind sail board, inner tube, air mattress, float tube, or other inflatable device must wear a USCG-approved life jacket or flotation assist device.
  • Every person boating on a river or in boat races must wear a USCG-approved life jacket.
  • Children under the age of 13 must wear a USCG-approved life jacket while underway unless the child is below deck or in an enclosed cabin.

ALL LIFE JACKETS MUST BE:

  • In good and serviceable condition, which means no tears, rips, or broken straps or snaps,
  • Readily accessible, which means you can put the life jacket on quickly in an emergency, and
  • Of the proper size for the intended wearer. Sizing for life jackets is based on body weight and chest size.

MAKE SURE IT FITS

  1. You do not want your life jacket too large or too small. A snug fit is a proper fit. Remember, life jackets for adults do not work for children.
  2. Make sure the life jacket is properly fastened.
  3. All straps, buckles, or zippers are secure.
  4. Hold your arms straight up over your head.
  5. Ask a friend to grasp the tops of the arm openings and gently pull up.
  6. A snug fit means the life jacket fits properly.

WARNINGS

Double check that your life jacket is approved for your favorite water activities. Read the label—Some life jackets are NOT approved for:

  • Water skiing or tubing
  • Personal watercraft or wakeboarding
  • White water paddling
  • Which Life Jacket Do You Need? (interactive quiz)
  • How to Choose the Right Life Jacket (PDF)

PADDLESPORTS

New Mexico offers a range of paddlesports opportunities, from adrenaline-pumping whitewater rafting to mellow river floats. New Mexico’s small mountain lakes are popular with paddlers all summer long. In fall the larger reservoirs become quieter, calmer, and less crowded.

Some canoeists and kayakers find paddling is an excellent way to fish or view wildlife. Others enjoy camping with their boats. And some have even been known to enjoy the Albuquerque International Balloon Fiesta from the Rio Grande.

New Mexico’s lakes and rivers require different skills, preparation, and safety equipment for paddlers. We recommend you take courses to learn the laws, emergency procedures, navigation rules, and paddling techniques—all of which will enhance your paddling experience.

BEFORE YOU GO

Kayaks, canoes, paddleboards, inner tubes, and any other watercraft capable of being used for transportation on the water are subject to state boating laws and regulations. You are urged to boat responsibly to prevent accidents, minimize impacts, and avoid conflicts with other boaters. The following guidelines will help you prepare before you head out on your paddling adventure.

GET EDUCATED

Know the laws and keep yourself and others safe. Take a course to increase your knowledge of paddle sports safety, emergency procedures, and navigational rules. You can join workshops offered at local swimming pools and parks departments, community colleges, and military recreation centers. Group outings are organized by the American Canoe Association, the Adobe Whitewater Club of New Mexico, and various internet meetup groups. Many commercial outfitters and free online courses are also available.

Make sure to always follow the life jacket guidance as laid out above.

CARRY ESSENTIAL GEAR

Carry the essentials for safety, emergency communications, and comfort. At a minimum, state law requires you to carry and wear a U.S. Coast Guard-approved life jacket, a paddle or oar, and a sound-producing device such as a whistle or horn—even on a paddleboard.

In addition to items required by law, you should wear sun protection and bring a headlamp with extra batteries, first aid kit, knife, dry bag, hydrating fluids, and a throw rope. Remember that many lakes and rivers are in remote areas where cell phones do not always work. Other essentials depend on your vessel, the lake or river, and the length of trip and should be researched in advance.

CHECK AND UNDERSTAND THE WEATHER

Check the weather frequently before and during your trip, keeping an eye on current conditions. Check river flows and lake conditions, weather warnings, and forecasts. It is important to understand how these elements affect your ability to operate your vessel. Seek information from locals in the know, heed warnings, and avoid unsafe areas. Anticipate changes and go to shore when rough weather threatens.

PROTECT AGAINST COLD WATER SHOCK

Although New Mexico is a desert state, the water can be quite cold. Many lakes are fed by melting snow. Several rivers are located downstream of large dams that release cold water from deep below the lake’s surface.

Always dress for the temperature of the water—even on a hot day. The biggest risk after an accidental fall overboard is not hypothermia but cold-water shock. Sudden immersion in cold water can trigger the “gasp” reflex. When a person’s head is underwater, the “gasp” reflex causes water to enter the lungs. Cold water shock is a major contributor to the death of New Mexico boaters who entered the water unprepared. Paddlecraft have a higher risk of capsizing and swamping. Be prepared and always wear a life jacket—it is the law!

BE VISIBLE TO OTHER BOATERS

Paddlecraft sit low on the water, making them difficult for other boaters to see. Paddle to be seen: Wear bright neon and contrasting colors, put highly reflective tape on paddles, use a flagpole, and carry a bright light at night.

FILE A FLOAT PLAN

Study your intended route before you head out and let someone know your plans. Include names of everyone going, a description of your vessel, put-in and take-out locations and waypoints along with the approximate time the group should arrive at each, what time you are returning, and what to do if you do not return when expected. Estimate travel time generously. Make this a routine every time you go out on the water.

AVOID ALCOHOL AND DRUGS

Situational awareness is key to safety on the water. That means always staying alert. Operating any vessel while under the influence of alcohol or drugs, including marijuana, is not only unsafe—it is illegal. New Mexico’s Boating Under the Influence (BUI) law applies to all vessels including kayaks, canoes, paddleboards, rowboats, and inflatable fishing rafts.

WATCH FOR RIVER HAZARDS

A paddle trip downriver can include these river hazards.

  • Low-head dams: These structures are difficult to see and can trap river paddlers. Consult a map of the river before your trip and know where dams are located. Always carry your craft around them. Currents above low-head dams can sweep vessels over the dam. Currents below can suck vessels back toward the face of the dam. The recirculating currents and turbulent waters can swamp vessels and drown boaters. Low-head dams on the Rio Grande, Pecos River, San Juan River, and Animas River divert water into canals. The canals deliver drinking water to major cities and irrigation water to farms.
  • Rapids: When approaching rapids, go ashore well upstream and check them out before continuing. If you see dangerous conditions, carry your craft around them. Properly designed and fitted helmets should be worn when running rapids. When water levels are too low or too high, rapids can become dangerous or impossible to navigate. View current river flow rates.
  • Strainers: These river obstructions allow water to pass through but stop and hold boats and people. Strainers can include fallen trees, overhanging branches, debris piles, and submerged fences. They can flip your boat and pin you underwater against the object. Even when the river current is slow, give strainers as much room as possible.

 

 Leasburg Diversion Dam

Leasburg Diversion Dam, only 10 feet high, poses a danger to paddle craft operators.

LABEL YOUR PADDLECRAFT

If you own paddle craft, keep your contact information in your boat, on a sticker, or in some other way. When unoccupied paddle craft are found adrift, it is assumed someone is in danger and a search is launched. Calling the owner can help prevent unnecessary searches and free up resources. The call could help rescuers gather information that helps with the search. The U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary provides free identification stickers at its boating safety classes and at other boating events.

ON THE WATER

  • Paddle with a group. Go out with at least three people and stay close enough for visual or verbal contact. If a paddler gets injured, one person can stay with him or her while the other leaves to get help.
  • Stay near the shore when there is a lot of boat traffic. Approaching wakes head on will help keep water out of your craft and avoid capsizing.
  • Expect the unexpected—you may capsize or fall out of the boat. If you fall in a river, keep your feet off the bottom and pointed downstream to avoid getting snagged or stuck.
  • Scan ahead and look for hazards like overhanging branches and trees, rocks, low bridges, or rapids.
  • When in doubt, get out and scout! Do not take a chance of paddling rapids or currents you are not used to. Make sure to check for rocks that are dangerously close to the surface.
  • Know how to rescue yourself and others in the event of a capsize. Consider carrying a throw bag, rescue kit, and a towing system.
  • Self-care is important for staying alert. Know your limits, stay hydrated, etc.

RENTALS, INSTRUCTION, and LOCAL PRACTICE

Check local colleges, parks and recreation departments, outdoor stores, and outfitters for upcoming clinics and pool sessions. Rangers at your local state park may know of privately-owned rental companies and outfitters that are familiar with local boating conditions.

SAFETY CAMPAIGNS

LIFE JACKET LOANER PROGRAM

New Mexico State Parks facilitates a statewide life jacket loaner program in partnership with the Boat U.S. Foundation, the Sea Tow Foundation, and federal and local government agencies.

WHAT IS A LIFE JACKET LOANER PROGRAM?

When you go out boating and do not have a life jacket or find yours does not fit properly, you can visit a life jacket loaner station and borrow an infant, child, youth, or adult life jacket for the day or weekend—at no charge. When finished, simply return the life jackets to the same station.

Life jacket loaner stations are located at various parks and recreation areas, marinas, and boat ramps.

Interactive map or list of loaner life jacket sites.

OPERATION DRY WATER

Operation Dry Water is a year-round boating under the influence awareness and enforcement campaign. Learn more at Operation Dry Water.  

MARINE LAW ENFORCEMENT

LOCAL REGULATIONS AND ENFORCEMENT

New Mexico State Parks rangers, New Mexico sheriffs, and New Mexico State Police officers have full authority to enforce New Mexico’s boating laws and regulations. Some waters have additional equipment and operational restrictions. Before boating on a particular water, check with the local authorities for additional regulations.

REGULATIONS

KNOW THE LAW

To ensure safety on the water for you and others, it is important that boaters be familiar with the Boat Act, the Boating While Intoxicated Act, and regulations of Boating Operation and Safety. Take the time to learn the laws and regulations for vessel length, capacity, required equipment, anchoring and mooring, prohibited operation, and traffic control.

ALCOHOL and DRUGS

New Mexico law prohibits anyone from operating under the influence of alcohol or any drug or other controlled substance. It is illegal to operate with a blood alcohol content (BAC) of 0.08 or higher.

NAVIGATING ON NEW MEXICO WATERS

Safe navigation is the responsibility of all boaters. When a person operating a vessel meets, overtakes, or crosses another vessel’s course, the operator shall take the appropriate action.

  • Meeting head-on: both vessels shall turn to starboard (right).
  • Overtaking: the vessel that is overtaking another vessel should keep clear of the vessel being overtaken.
  • Crossing paths: the vessel approaching from the left shall give way by altering course, slowing down, stopping, or reversing.
  • Power operated vessels: a power operated vessel shall yield the right-of-way to a non-powered vessel.
  • Vessel departure/arrival: a vessel leaving a pier or dock has the right-of-way over a vessel approaching a dock.
  • Distance: vessels shall keep 150 feet away from swimmers, water skiers, fishermen, diver flags, and others not participating in the same activity.

TUBING, WATERSKIING AND WAKEBOARDING

Every person who is towed behind a vessel on a tube, water skis, a wakeboard, or a similar object must wear a U.S. Coast Guard-approved personal floatation device approved for the activity. New Mexico law states that the following dangerous practices are illegal:

  • Towing a person between one hour after sunset and one hour before sunrise.
  • Towing a person within 150 feet of public docks, mooring lines, launch ramps, boats, anglers, swimmers, or any person not also doing the same activity.
  • Towing a person so that he or she becomes airborne (except on a parasail).
  • Towing a person in a manner that would cause the person or object being towed to collide with any object or person.

In addition to carrying all required safety equipment, a motorboat operator who tows anyone behind his or her vessel must also have on board:

  1. A skier-down flag that is displayed in all directions when the person is in the water.
  2. One of the following
    • a wide-angle rear-view mirror that gives the motorboat operator an unobstructed view of the person or object being towed
    • an observer in addition to the operator

In addition to carrying all required safety equipment, a personal watercraft operator who tows anyone behind his or her vessel must also have on board:

  1. A skier-down flag that is displayed in all directions when the person is in the water.
  2. An observer on board in addition to the operator.
  3. Manufacturer-approved seating for the operator, observer, and each person being towed.

ANCHORING AND MOORING

It is illegal to:

  • Anchor a vessel within 150 feet of a marina, boat ramp or courtesy dock.
  • Attach a vessel to a buoy (except a mooring buoy).
  • Attach a vessel to a courtesy dock for longer than 10 minutes.
  • Allow an anchored or moored vessel to drift or damage property.

PREVENT POLLUTION

Discharging or depositing liquid or solid waste into state waters is illegal. This includes oil and gray water. Polluters may be held civilly liable for cleanup costs and may be fined thousands of dollars. Visit the New Mexico Environment Department Surface Water Quality Bureau to learn more and to report a spill.

PROHIBITED OPERATIONS

New Mexico law states that the following dangerous operating practices are illegal:

  • Reckless or negligent operation.
  • Overloading a vessel.
  • Bow riding.
  • Teak surfing (“platform dragging”).
    • Sitting on a seat back while the vessel is underway.
      • Allowing your legs to hang overboard at any time.
  • Allowing a child younger than 13 to operate a vessel without onboard adult supervision.

BOAT ACCIDENT REPORTING

A boater who is involved in an accident must stop his or her vessel immediately at the scene of the accident and assist injured people or anyone in danger, unless doing so would seriously endanger his or her own vessel or passengers. The boater must give his or her name, address, and identification of the vessel in writing to any person injured and to the owner of any property damaged in the accident.

The boater operating the vessel must immediately notify the local law enforcement agency that a boating accident has occurred. In some circumstances, he or she must also submit a written accident report to New Mexico State Parks within 48 hours.

The operator of a recreational vessel involved in an accident must submit an accident report (regardless of the number of boats involved) to New Mexico State Parks within 48 hours when:

      • Loss of life occurs.
      • Injury occurs which requires medical treatment beyond first aid.
      • A person disappears from a vessel.
      • Vessel or property damage is more than $100, or there is complete loss of a vessel.

Boat Operator Report Form

Forms are also available from offices of state parks with lakes. Additionally, forms may be requested from, and completed forms may be mailed to:

New Mexico State Parks
Boating Safety Program
1220 South St. Francis Drive
Santa Fe, NM 87505
888-667-2757

or email: nm.parks@state.nm.us

Failure to comply with the above requirements is a petty misdemeanor punishable by a penalty up to $500. Pursuant to NMSA 1978, Section 66-12-12, information from this report is confidential and will be used only by government agencies for statistical purposes. It may not be used as evidence in a civil or criminal trial.

VESSEL REGISTRATION

TITLE, REGISTRATION and RENEWAL

To operate your vessel in New Mexico, you must have a registration card and validation decal if:

      • Your vessel is propelled by machinery.
      • Your vessel is propelled, or designed to be propelled, by sail, unless it is a sailboard or windsurf board.

The registration card (certificate of number) must be carried on board whenever your vessel is used.

TITLE and REGISTRATION RULES

Vessel registration and titling is handled by the New Mexico Taxation and Revenue Department Motor Vehicle Division. Vessels that require registration and are 10 feet or longer must also be titled. The application for title must submitted to the MVD within 30 days of sale. A penalty is assessed for late applications. Contact your local MVD office and ask for an employee who can process boat transactions. At some locations, this service may be available only during certain days or hours.

The registration fee is based on the length of the vessel. The registration period ends on December 31 of the third calendar year of registration.

BOATERS VISITING NEW MEXICO

Boaters visiting New Mexico from another state may recreate on state waters for up to 90 days if the vessel is registered in another state or has current U.S. Coast Guard documentation. Once your boat has been in New Mexico for 90 consecutive days, you must either remove it from New Mexico or register it in this state.

BOAT RENTALS

RENTAL AGENTS

A motorboat may be rented for up to 30 days. New Mexico’s mandatory boating education law requires businesses that rent motorboats to review the dockside safety checklist with each authorized operator. The checklist includes operating instructions and a summary of laws regarding the rental motorboat’s safe operation. This includes:

      • sail/float plan
      • emergency preparedness information
      • pre-departure maintenance check
      • required equipment check
      • handling/loading specifications and
      • weather forecast

Rental agents must review the contents of the checklist with each authorized operator to ensure every statement about operation and safety equipment is understood. The authorized operator must initial each item, sign, and keep the checklist onboard the rental motorboat. Boaters who do not carry the checklist aboard rented motorboats may be ticketed if stopped by a marine law enforcement officer.

RENTAL BOAT RESPONSIBILITY

Marine law enforcement officers may cite the operator and owner of a rental boat for violation of 18.17.2.10 NMAC, which states that if a vessel does not contain the safety equipment required, then either the rental agent or the operator, or both, may be cited. Owners of rental vessels, non-motorized vessels, need to ensure that the boat is properly equipped with all legally required safety equipment before allowing it to enter the water.

REQUIRED SAFETY EQUIPMENT

PERSONAL WATERCRAFT (PWC)

“Personal watercraft” (PWC) means a class A motorboat less than 16 feet, designed to be operated by a person sitting, standing, or kneeling on the vessel rather than the operator sitting or standing inside the vessel. Examples include Jet Ski, Sea-Doo, Wave Runner, and similar devices.

For additional information or questions take a Boating Safety Course or contact your local New Mexico state park lake and speak with a New Mexico State Parks marine law enforcement officer.

For your personal watercraft (PWC) here is the list of legally required equipment and additional boating safety information.

LEGALLY REQUIRED EQUIPMENT:

  • Certificate of Number (registration card) on board and available for inspection. 18.17.2 NMAC
  • Boater Education Card on board. 18.17.4 NMAC
  • Registration Numbers on each side of the motorboat’s forward half. 18.17.2 NMAC
  • Personal Flotation Device (PFD) for each person on board, in serviceable condition, and approved by the U.S. Coast Guard. (All persons on a PWC must wear a life jacket.) 18.17.2 NMAC
  • Fire Extinguisher (Type B-I) approved by the U.S. Coast Guard, if the vessel has an inboard engine, closed compartments under thwarts and seats where portable fuel tanks may be stored, double bottoms not sealed to the hull or that are not filled with flotation material, closed living spaces, closed storage compartments in which combustible or flammable materials may be stored, or permanently installed fuel tanks. 18.17.2 NMAC
  • Rope of at least equal length to the vessel. Section 66-12-7 NMSA 1978
  • Paddle or Oar. Section 66-12-7 NMSA 1978
  • Bailing Bucket with a capacity of at least one gallon or hand-operated Bilge Pump. Section 66-12-7 NMSA 1978
  • Sound Producing Device capable of producing a two-second blast that is audible for at least one-half mile, such as a horn or whistle. 18.17.2 NMAC
  • Ventilation System if carrying or using any flammable or toxic fluid in any enclosure for any purpose. Section 66-12-7 NMSA 1978
  • Backfire Flame Arrestor if vessel has an inboard motor. 18.17.2 NMAC
  • Engine Cut-off Switch Lanyard, attached to the operator, operator’s clothing, or operator’s PFD, if equipped. Section 66-12-11 NMSA 1978

ADDITIONAL BOATING SAFETY INFORMATION AND BOATING LAWS:

  • Do not exceed the capacity of the boat.
  • Properly working lights are required to be displayed between one half-hour after sunset to one-half hour before sunrise. Section 66-12-7 NMSA 1978 and 18.17.2 NMAC.
  • No person under the age of 13 may operate a motorboat unless under an adult’s onboard supervision. 18.17.2 NMAC.
  • Towing can only be legally done on a PWC rated for a minimum capacity of three people and an observer must be on board. 18.17.2 NMAC
    • On a three-person PWC, only one person at a time may be towed (three people = operator, observer and person being towed).
    • Towing more than one person on a PWC will exceed the capacity of a three-person PWC.
  • A red or orange flag (commonly referred to as skier down flag) is required to be displayed when a person or people being towed are in the water. The flag must be at least one foot square. 18.17.2 NMAC

 

Life jackets must be approved by the U.S. Coast Guard, be in good condition, be properly sized for each person, and be readily accessible.

New Mexico State Parks recommends that all boaters take a boating safety course. A list of classes and additional on-line options can be found at BoatNM.com.

Some boating waters have local regulations more restrictive than state law. Contact each boating water for additional regulations before you boat.

All boat accidents that involve a missing person, injury beyond first aid, and/or damage greater than $100 must be reported to the local law enforcement agency and New Mexico State Parks—no exceptions!

Operators are subject to arrest for being under the influence of alcohol or drugs.

MOTORBOAT LESS THAN 16 FEET (CLASS A)

“Motorboat” means any vessel propelled by machinery, whether machinery is the principal source of propulsion but does not include a vessel that has a valid marine document issued by the bureau of customs of the United States government or any federal agency successor thereto.

For additional information or questions take a Boating Safety Course or contact your local New Mexico state park lake and speak with a New Mexico State Parks marine law enforcement officer.

For your motorboat less than 16 feet (class A) here is the list of legally required equipment and additional boating safety information.

LEGALLY REQUIRED EQUIPMENT:

  • Certificate of Number (registration card) on board and available for inspection. 18.17.2 NMAC
  • Boater Education Card on board. 18.17.4 NMAC
  • Registration Numbers on each side of the motorboat’s forward half. 18.17.2 NMAC
  • Personal Flotation Device (PFD) for each person on board, in serviceable condition, readily accessible, and approved by the U.S. Coast Guard. 18.17.2 NMAC
  • Throwable Personal Flotation Device, in serviceable condition, readily accessible, and approved by the U.S. Coast Guard. 18.17.2 NMAC
  • Fire Extinguisher (Type B-I) approved by the U.S. Coast Guard, if the vessel has an inboard engine, closed compartments under thwarts and seats where portable fuel tanks may be stored, double bottoms not sealed to the hull or that are not filled with flotation material, closed living spaces, closed storage compartments in which combustible or flammable materials may be stored, or permanently installed fuel tanks. 18.17.2 NMAC
  • Rope of at least equal length to the vessel. Section 66-12-7 NMSA 1978
  • Paddle or Oar. Section 66-12-7 NMSA 1978
  • Bailing Bucket with a capacity of at least one gallon, or hand-operated Bilge Pump. Section 66-12-7 NMSA 1978
  • Sound Producing Device capable of producing a two-second blast that is audible for at least one-half mile, such as a horn or whistle. 18.17.2 NMAC
  • Ventilation System, if carrying or using any flammable or toxic fluid in any enclosure for any purpose. Section 66-12-7 NMSA 1978
  • Backfire Flame Arrestor if vessel has an inboard motor. 18.17.2 NMAC
  • Engine Cut-off Switch Lanyard, attached to the operator, operator’s clothing, or operator’s PFD, if equipped. Section 66-12-11 NMSA 1978

ADDITIONAL BOATING SAFETY INFORMATION AND BOATING LAWS:

  • Do not exceed the capacity of the boat. (Count the people being towed as well as the people in the boat.)
  • Properly working lights are required to be displayed between one half-hour after sunset to one-half hour before sunrise. Section 66-12-7 NMSA 1978 and 18.17.2 NMAC.
  • Children under the age of 13 may not operate a motorboat except when under an adult’s onboard supervision. 18.17.2 NMAC.
  • Life jackets must be worn by:
    • children under the age of 13 while underway except when below deck or in an enclosed cabin,
    • every person towed behind a vessel, and
    • persons boating on a river. Section 66-12-14 NMSA 1978 and 18.17.2 NMAC
  • Towing can be legally done only if:
    • the vessel is equipped with a device capable of letting the operator have an unobstructed view of the person or object being towed, or
    • an observer is on board in addition to the operator. Section 66-12-14 NMSA 1978
  • A red or orange flag (commonly referred to as skier down flag) is required to be displayed when a person or people being towed are in the water. The flag must be at least one foot square. 18.17.2 NMAC

 

Life jackets must be approved by the U.S. Coast Guard, be in good condition, be properly sized for each person, and be readily accessible.

New Mexico State Parks recommends that all boaters take a boating safety course. A list of classes and additional on-line options can be found at BoatNM.com.

Some boating waters have local regulations more restrictive than state law. Contact each boating water for additional regulations before you boat.

All boat accidents that involve a missing person, injury beyond first aid, and/or damage greater than $100 must be reported to the local law enforcement agency and New Mexico State Parks—no exceptions!

Operators are subject to arrest for being under the influence of alcohol or drugs.

MOTORBOAT 16 FEET–LESS THAN 26 FEET (CLASS 1)

“Motorboat” means any vessel propelled by machinery, whether machinery is the principal source of propulsion but does not include a vessel that has a valid marine document issued by the bureau of customs of the United States government or any federal agency successor thereto.

For additional information or questions take a Boating Safety Course or contact your local New Mexico state park lake and speak with a New Mexico State Parks marine law enforcement officer.

For your motorboat 16 feet–less than 26 feet (class 1) here is the list of legally required equipment and additional boating safety information.

LEGALLY REQUIRED EQUIPMENT:

  • Certificate of Number (registration card) on board and available for inspection. 18.17.2 NMAC
  • Boater Education Card on board. 18.17.4 NMAC
  • Registration Numbers on each side of the motorboat’s forward half. 18.17.2 NMAC
  • Personal Flotation Device (PFD) for each person on board, in serviceable condition, readily accessible, and approved by the U.S. Coast Guard. 18.17.2 NMAC
  • Throwable Personal Flotation Device, in serviceable condition, readily accessible, and approved by the U.S. Coast Guard. 18.17.2 NMAC
  • Fire Extinguisher (Type B-I) approved by the U.S. Coast Guard, if the vessel has an inboard engine, closed compartments under thwarts and seats where portable fuel tanks may be stored, double bottoms not sealed to the hull or that are not filled with flotation material, closed living spaces, closed storage compartments in which combustible or flammable materials may be stored, or permanently installed fuel tanks. 18.17.2 NMAC
  • Rope of at least equal length to the vessel. Section 66-12-7 NMSA 1978
  • Paddle or Oar. Section 66-12-7 NMSA 1978
  • Bailing Bucket with a capacity of at least one gallon, or hand-operated Bilge Pump. Section 66-12-7 NMSA 1978
  • Sound Producing Device capable of producing a two-second blast that is audible for at least one-half mile, such as a horn or whistle. 18.17.2 NMAC
  • Ventilation System, if carrying or using any flammable or toxic fluid in any enclosure for any purpose. Section 66-12-7 NMSA 1978
  • Backfire Flame Arrestor if vessel has an inboard motor. 18.17.2 NMAC

ADDITIONAL BOATING SAFETY INFORMATION AND BOATING LAWS:

  • Do not exceed the capacity of the boat. (Count the people being towed as well as the people in the boat.)
  • Properly working lights are required to be displayed between one half-hour after sunset to one-half hour before sunrise. Section 66-12-7 NMSA 1978 and 18.17.2 NMAC.
  • Children under the age of 13 may not operate a motorboat except when under an adult’s onboard supervision. 18.17.2 NMAC.
  • Life jackets must be worn by:
    • children under the age of 13 while underway except when below deck or in an enclosed cabin,
    • every person towed behind a vessel, and
    • persons boating on a river. Section 66-12-14 NMSA 1978 and 18.17.2 NMAC
  • Towing can be legally done only if:
    • the vessel is equipped with a device capable of letting the operator have an unobstructed view of the person or object being towed, or
    • an observer is on board in addition to the operator. Section 66-12-14 NMSA 1978
  • A red or orange flag (commonly referred to as skier down flag) is required to be displayed when a person or people being towed are in the water. The flag must be at least one foot square. 18.17.2 NMAC

 

Life jackets must be approved by the U.S. Coast Guard, be in good condition, be properly sized for each person, and be readily accessible.

New Mexico State Parks recommends that all boaters take a boating safety course. A list of classes and additional on-line options can be found at BoatNM.com.

Some boating waters have local regulations more restrictive than state law. Contact each boating water for additional regulations before you boat.

All boat accidents that involve a missing person, injury beyond first aid, and/or damage greater than $100 must be reported to the local law enforcement agency and New Mexico State Parks—no exceptions!

Operators are subject to arrest for being under the influence of alcohol or drugs.

MOTORBOAT 26 FEET–LESS THAN 40 FEET (CLASS 2)

“Motorboat” means any vessel propelled by machinery, whether machinery is the principal source of propulsion but does not include a vessel that has a valid marine document issued by the bureau of customs of the United States government or any federal agency successor thereto.

For additional information or questions take a Boating Safety Course or contact your local New Mexico state park lake and speak with a New Mexico State Parks marine law enforcement officer.

For your motorboat 26 feet–less than 40 feet (class 2) here is the list of legally required equipment and additional boating safety information.

LEGALLY REQUIRED EQUIPMENT:

  • Certificate of Number (registration card) on board and available for inspection. 18.17.2 NMAC
  • Boater Education Card on board. 18.17.4 NMAC
  • Registration Numbers on each side of the motorboat’s forward half. 18.17.2 NMAC
  • Personal Flotation Device (PFD) for each person on board, in serviceable condition, readily accessible, and approved by the U.S. Coast Guard. 18.17.2 NMAC
  • Throwable Personal Flotation Device, in serviceable condition, readily accessible, and approved by the U.S. Coast Guard. 18.17.2 NMAC
  • Fire Extinguisher (two Type B-Is or one Type B-II) approved by the U.S. Coast Guard, if the vessel has an inboard engine, closed compartments under thwarts and seats where portable fuel tanks may be stored, double bottoms not sealed to the hull or that are not completely filled with flotation material, closed living spaces, closed storage compartments in which combustible or flammable materials may be stored, or permanently installed fuel tanks. 18.17.2 NMAC
  • Rope of at least equal length to the vessel. Section 66-12-7 NMSA 1978
  • Paddle or Oar. Section 66-12-7 NMSA 1978
  • Bailing Bucket with a capacity of at least one gallon, or hand-operated Bilge Pump. Section 66-12-7 NMSA 1978
  • Horn or Whistle capable of producing a two-second blast that is audible for at least one mile, and a Bell. 18.17.2 NMAC
  • Ventilation System, if carrying or using any flammable or toxic fluid in any enclosure for any purpose. Section 66-12-7 NMSA 1978
  • Backfire Flame Arrestor if vessel has an inboard motor. 18.17.2 NMAC

ADDITIONAL BOATING SAFETY INFORMATION AND BOATING LAWS:

  • Do not exceed the capacity of the boat. (Count the people being towed as well as the people in the boat.)
  • Properly working lights are required to be displayed between one half-hour after sunset to one-half hour before sunrise. Section 66-12-7 NMSA 1978 and 18.17.2 NMAC.
  • Children under the age of 13 may not operate a motorboat except when under an adult’s onboard supervision. 18.17.2 NMAC.
  • Life jackets must be worn by:
    • children under the age of 13 while underway except when below deck or in an enclosed cabin,
    • every person towed behind a vessel, and
    • persons boating on a river. Section 66-12-14 NMSA 1978 and 18.17.2 NMAC
  • Towing can be legally done only if:
    • the vessel is equipped with a device capable of letting the operator have an unobstructed view of the person or object being towed, or
    • an observer is on board in addition to the operator. Section 66-12-14 NMSA 1978
  • A red or orange flag (commonly referred to as skier down flag) is required to be displayed when a person or people being towed are in the water. The flag must be at least one foot square. 18.17.2 NMAC

 

Life jackets must be approved by the U.S. Coast Guard, be in good condition, be properly sized for each person, and be readily accessible.

New Mexico State Parks recommends that all boaters take a boating safety course. A list of classes and additional on-line options can be found at BoatNM.com.

Some boating waters have local regulations more restrictive than state law. Contact each boating water for additional regulations before you boat.

All boat accidents that involve a missing person, injury beyond first aid, and/or damage greater than $100 must be reported to the local law enforcement agency and New Mexico State Parks—no exceptions!

Operators are subject to arrest for being under the influence of alcohol or drugs.

MOTORBOAT 40 FEET–LESS THAN 65 FEET (CLASS 3)

“Motorboat” means any vessel propelled by machinery, whether machinery is the principal source of propulsion but does not include a vessel that has a valid marine document issued by the bureau of customs of the United States government or any federal agency successor thereto.

For additional information or questions take a Boating Safety Course or contact your local New Mexico state park lake and speak with a New Mexico State Parks marine law enforcement officer.

For your motorboat 40 feet–less than 65 feet (class 3) here is the list of legally required equipment and additional boating safety information.

LEGALLY REQUIRED EQUIPMENT:

  • Certificate of Number (registration card) on board and available for inspection. 18.17.2 NMAC
  • Boater Education Card on board. 18.17.4 NMAC
  • Registration Numbers on each side of the motorboat’s forward half. 18.17.2 NMAC
  • Personal Flotation Device (PFD) for each person on board, in serviceable condition, readily accessible, and approved by the U.S. Coast Guard. 18.17.2 NMAC
  • Throwable Personal Flotation Device, in serviceable condition, readily accessible, and approved by the U.S. Coast Guard. 18.17.2 NMAC
  • Fire Extinguisher (three Type B-Is, or one Type B-I and one Type B-II) approved by the U.S. Coast Guard, if the vessel has an inboard engine, closed compartments under thwarts and seats where portable fuel tanks may be stored, double bottoms not sealed to the hull or that are not completely filled with flotation material, closed living spaces, closed storage compartments in which combustible or flammable materials may be stored, or permanently installed fuel tanks. 18.17.2 NMAC
  • Rope of at least equal length to the vessel. Section 66-12-7 NMSA 1978
  • Paddle or Oar. Section 66-12-7 NMSA 1978
  • Bailing Bucket with a capacity of at least one gallon, or hand-operated Bilge Pump. Section 66-12-7 NMSA 1978
  • Power operated Horn or Whistle capable of producing a two-second blast that is audible for at least one mile, and a Bell. 18.17.2 NMAC
  • Ventilation System, if carrying or using any flammable or toxic fluid in any enclosure for any purpose. Section 66-12-7 NMSA 1978
  • Backfire Flame Arrestor if vessel has an inboard motor. 18.17.2 NMAC

ADDITIONAL BOATING SAFETY INFORMATION AND BOATING LAWS:

  • Do not exceed the capacity of the boat. (Count the people being towed as well as the people in the boat.)
  • Properly working lights are required to be displayed between one half-hour after sunset to one-half hour before sunrise. Section 66-12-7 NMSA 1978 and 18.17.2 NMAC.
  • Children under the age of 13 may not operate a motorboat except when under an adult’s onboard supervision. 18.17.2 NMAC.
  • Life jackets must be worn by:
    • children under the age of 13 while underway except when below deck or in an enclosed cabin,
    • every person towed behind a vessel, and
    • persons boating on a river. Section 66-12-14 NMSA 1978 and 18.17.2 NMAC
  • Towing can be legally done only if:
    • the vessel is equipped with a device capable of letting the operator have an unobstructed view of the person or object being towed, or
    • an observer is on board in addition to the operator. Section 66-12-14 NMSA 1978
  • A red or orange flag (commonly referred to as skier down flag) is required to be displayed when a person or people being towed are in the water. The flag must be at least one foot square. 18.17.2 NMAC

 

Life jackets must be approved by the U.S. Coast Guard, be in good condition, be properly sized for each person, and be readily accessible.

New Mexico State Parks recommends that all boaters take a boating safety course. A list of classes and additional on-line options can be found at BoatNM.com.

Some boating waters have local regulations more restrictive than state law. Contact each boating water for additional regulations before you boat.

All boat accidents that involve a missing person, injury beyond first aid, and/or damage greater than $100 must be reported to the local law enforcement agency and New Mexico State Parks—no exceptions!

Operators are subject to arrest for being under the influence of alcohol or drugs.

SAILBOAT LESS THAN 16 FEET (CLASS A)

“Sailboat” means any vessel propelled or designed to be propelled by sail and that does not have a valid document issued by a federal agency but does not include a sailboard or windsurf board.

For additional information or questions take a Boating Safety Course or contact your local New Mexico state park lake and speak with a New Mexico State Parks marine law enforcement officer.

For your sailboat less than 16 feet (class A) here is the list of legally required equipment and additional boating safety information.

LEGALLY REQUIRED EQUIPMENT:

  • Certificate of Number (registration card) on board and available for inspection. 18.17.2 NMAC
  • Boater Education Card on board. 18.17.4 NMAC
  • Registration Numbers on each side of the sailboat’s forward half. 18.17.2 NMAC
  • Personal Flotation Device (PFD) for each person on board, in serviceable condition, readily accessible, and approved by the U.S. Coast Guard. 18.17.2 NMAC
  • Throwable Personal Flotation Device, in serviceable condition, readily accessible, and approved by the U.S. Coast Guard. 18.17.2 NMAC
  • Fire Extinguisher (Type B-I) approved by the U.S. Coast Guard, if the vessel has an inboard engine, closed compartments under thwarts and seats where portable fuel tanks may be stored, double bottoms not sealed to the hull or that are not filled with flotation material, closed living spaces, closed storage compartments in which combustible or flammable materials may be stored, or permanently installed fuel tanks. 18.17.2 NMAC
  • Rope of at least equal length to the vessel. Section 66-12-7 NMSA 1978
  • Paddle or Oar. Section 66-12-7 NMSA 1978
  • Bailing Bucket with a capacity of at least one gallon, or hand-operated Bilge Pump. Section 66-12-7 NMSA 1978
  • Sound Producing Device capable of producing a two-second blast that is audible for at least one-half mile, such as a horn or whistle. 18.17.2 NMAC
  • Ventilation System, if carrying or using any flammable or toxic fluid in any enclosure for any purpose. Section 66-12-7 NMSA 1978
  • Backfire Flame Arrestor if vessel has an inboard motor. 18.17.2 NMAC

ADDITIONAL BOATING SAFETY INFORMATION AND BOATING LAWS:

  • Do not exceed the capacity of the boat. (Count the people being towed as well as the people in the boat.)
  • Properly working lights are required to be displayed between one half-hour after sunset to one-half hour before sunrise. Section 66-12-7 NMSA 1978 and 18.17.2 NMAC.
  • Children under the age of 13 may not operate a sailboat except when under an adult’s onboard supervision. 18.17.2 NMAC.
  • Children under the age of 13 must wear their life jacket while underway except when below deck or in an enclosed cabin. 18.17.2 NMAC.
  • Persons engaged in boating on a river must wear a life jacket. 18.17.2 NMAC.
  • Persons using ice sailboats must wear a life jacket. 18.17.2 NMAC.

 

Life jackets must be approved by the U.S. Coast Guard, be in good condition, be properly sized for each person, and be readily accessible.

New Mexico State Parks recommends that all boaters take a boating safety course. A list of classes and additional on-line options can be found at BoatNM.com.

Some boating waters have local regulations more restrictive than state law. Contact each boating water for additional regulations before you boat.

All boat accidents that involve a missing person, injury beyond first aid, and/or damage greater than $100 must be reported to the local law enforcement agency and New Mexico State Parks—no exceptions!

Operators are subject to arrest for being under the influence of alcohol or drugs.

SAILBOAT 16 FEET–LESS THAN 26 FEET (CLASS 1)

“Sailboat” means any vessel propelled or designed to be propelled by sail and that does not have a valid document issued by a federal agency but does not include a sailboard or windsurf board.

For additional information or questions take a Boating Safety Course or contact your local New Mexico state park lake and speak with a New Mexico State Parks marine law enforcement officer.

For your sailboat 16 feet–less than 26 feet (class 1) here is the list of legally required equipment and additional boating safety information.

LEGALLY REQUIRED EQUIPMENT:

  • Certificate of Number (registration card) on board and available for inspection. 18.17.2 NMAC
  • Boater Education Card on board. 18.17.4 NMAC
  • Registration Numbers on each side of the motorboat’s forward half. 18.17.2 NMAC
  • Personal Flotation Device (PFD) for each person on board, in serviceable condition, readily accessible, and approved by the U.S. Coast Guard. 18.17.2 NMAC
  • Throwable Personal Flotation Device, in serviceable condition, readily accessible, and approved by the U.S. Coast Guard. 18.17.2 NMAC
  • Fire Extinguisher (Type B-I) approved by the U.S. Coast Guard, if the vessel has an inboard engine, closed compartments under thwarts and seats where portable fuel tanks may be stored, double bottoms not sealed to the hull or that are not filled with flotation material, closed living spaces, closed storage compartments in which combustible or flammable materials may be stored, or permanently installed fuel tanks. 18.17.2 NMAC
  • Rope of at least equal length to the vessel. Section 66-12-7 NMSA 1978
  • Paddle or Oar. Section 66-12-7 NMSA 1978
  • Bailing Bucket with a capacity of at least one gallon, or hand-operated Bilge Pump. Section 66-12-7 NMSA 1978
  • Sound Producing Device capable of producing a two-second blast that is audible for at least one-half mile, such as a horn or whistle. 18.17.2 NMAC
  • Ventilation System, if carrying or using any flammable or toxic fluid in any enclosure for any purpose. Section 66-12-7 NMSA 1978
  • Backfire Flame Arrestor if vessel has an inboard motor. 18.17.2 NMAC
  • Engine Cut-off Switch Lanyard, attached to the operator, operator’s clothing, or operator’s PFD, if equipped. Section 66-12-11 NMSA 1978

ADDITIONAL BOATING SAFETY INFORMATION AND BOATING LAWS:

  • Do not exceed the capacity of the boat. (Count the people being towed as well as the people in the boat.)
  • Properly working lights are required to be displayed between one half-hour after sunset to one-half hour before sunrise. Section 66-12-7 NMSA 1978 and 18.17.2 NMAC.
  • Children under the age of 13 may not operate a sailboat except when under an adult’s onboard supervision. 18.17.2 NMAC.
  • Children under the age of 13 must wear their life jacket while underway except when below deck or in an enclosed cabin. 18.17.2 NMAC.
  • Persons engaged in boating on a river must wear a life jacket. 18.17.2 NMAC.
  • Persons using ice sailboats must wear a life jacket. 18.17.2 NMAC.

 

Life jackets must be approved by the U.S. Coast Guard, be in good condition, be properly sized for each person, and be readily accessible.

New Mexico State Parks recommends that all boaters take a boating safety course. A list of classes and additional on-line options can be found at BoatNM.com.

Some boating waters have local regulations more restrictive than state law. Contact each boating water for additional regulations before you boat.

All boat accidents that involve a missing person, injury beyond first aid, and/or damage greater than $100 must be reported to the local law enforcement agency and New Mexico State Parks—no exceptions!

Operators are subject to arrest for being under the influence of alcohol or drugs.

SAILBOAT 26 FEET–LESS THAN 40 FEET (CLASS 2)

“Sailboat” means any vessel propelled or designed to be propelled by sail and that does not have a valid document issued by a federal agency but does not include a sailboard or windsurf board.

For additional information or questions take a Boating Safety Course or contact your local New Mexico state park lake and speak with a New Mexico State Parks marine law enforcement officer.

For your sailboat 26 feet–less than 40 feet (class 2) here is the list of legally required equipment and additional boating safety information.

LEGALLY REQUIRED EQUIPMENT:

  • Certificate of Number (registration card) on board and available for inspection. 18.17.2 NMAC
  • Boater Education Card on board. 18.17.4 NMAC
  • Registration Numbers on each side of the motorboat’s forward half. 18.17.2 NMAC
  • Personal Flotation Device (PFD) for each person on board, in serviceable condition, readily accessible, and approved by the U.S. Coast Guard. 18.17.2 NMAC
  • Throwable Personal Flotation Device, in serviceable condition, readily accessible, and approved by the U.S. Coast Guard. 18.17.2 NMAC
  • Fire Extinguisher (two Type B-Is or one Type B-II) approved by the U.S. Coast Guard, if the vessel has an inboard engine, closed compartments under thwarts and seats where portable fuel tanks may be stored, double bottoms not sealed to the hull or that are not completely filled with flotation material, closed living spaces, closed storage compartments in which combustible or flammable materials may be stored, or permanently installed fuel tanks. 18.17.2 NMAC
  • Rope of at least equal length to the vessel. Section 66-12-7 NMSA 1978
  • Paddle or Oar. Section 66-12-7 NMSA 1978
  • Bailing Bucket with a capacity of at least one gallon, or hand-operated Bilge Pump. Section 66-12-7 NMSA 1978
  • Horn or Whistle capable of producing a two-second blast that is audible for at least one mile, and a Bell. 18.17.2 NMAC
  • Ventilation System, if carrying or using any flammable or toxic fluid in any enclosure for any purpose. Section 66-12-7 NMSA 1978
  • Backfire Flame Arrestor if vessel has an inboard motor. 18.17.2 NMAC
  • Engine Cut-off Switch Lanyard, attached to the operator, operator’s clothing, or operator’s PFD, if equipped. Section 66-12-11 NMSA 1978

ADDITIONAL BOATING SAFETY INFORMATION AND BOATING LAWS:

  • Do not exceed the capacity of the boat. (Count the people being towed as well as the people in the boat.)
  • Properly working lights are required to be displayed between one half-hour after sunset to one-half hour before sunrise. Section 66-12-7 NMSA 1978 and 18.17.2 NMAC.
  • Children under the age of 13 may not operate a sailboat except when under an adult’s onboard supervision. 18.17.2 NMAC.
  • Children under the age of 13 must wear their life jacket while underway except when below deck or in an enclosed cabin. 18.17.2 NMAC.
  • Persons engaged in boating on a river must wear a life jacket. 18.17.2 NMAC.
  • Persons using ice sailboats must wear a life jacket. 18.17.2 NMAC.

 

Life jackets must be approved by the U.S. Coast Guard, be in good condition, be properly sized for each person, and be readily accessible.

New Mexico State Parks recommends that all boaters take a boating safety course. A list of classes and additional on-line options can be found at BoatNM.com.

Some boating waters have local regulations more restrictive than state law. Contact each boating water for additional regulations before you boat.

All boat accidents that involve a missing person, injury beyond first aid, and/or damage greater than $100 must be reported to the local law enforcement agency and New Mexico State Parks—no exceptions!

Operators are subject to arrest for being under the influence of alcohol or drugs.

SAILBOAT 40 FEET–LESS THAN 65 FEET (CLASS 3)

“Sailboat” means any vessel propelled or designed to be propelled by sail and that does not have a valid document issued by a federal agency but does not include a sailboard or windsurf board.

For additional information or questions take a Boating Safety Course or contact your local New Mexico state park lake and speak with a New Mexico State Parks marine law enforcement officer.

For your sailboat 40 feet–less than 65 feet (class 3) here is the list of legally required equipment and additional boating safety information.

LEGALLY REQUIRED EQUIPMENT:

  • Certificate of Number (registration card) on board and available for inspection. 18.17.2 NMAC
  • Boater Education Card on board. 18.17.4 NMAC
  • Registration Numbers on each side of the motorboat’s forward half. 18.17.2 NMAC
  • Personal Flotation Device (PFD) for each person on board, in serviceable condition, readily accessible, and approved by the U.S. Coast Guard. 18.17.2 NMAC
  • Throwable Personal Flotation Device, in serviceable condition, readily accessible, and approved by the U.S. Coast Guard. 18.17.2 NMAC
  • Fire Extinguisher (three Type B-Is, or one Type B-I and one Type B-II) approved by the U.S. Coast Guard, if the vessel has an inboard engine, closed compartments under thwarts and seats where portable fuel tanks may be stored, double bottoms not sealed to the hull or that are not completely filled with flotation material, closed living spaces, closed storage compartments in which combustible or flammable materials may be stored, or permanently installed fuel tanks. 18.17.2 NMAC
  • Rope of at least equal length to the vessel. Section 66-12-7 NMSA 1978
  • Paddle or Oar. Section 66-12-7 NMSA 1978
  • Bailing Bucket with a capacity of at least one gallon, or hand-operated Bilge Pump. Section 66-12-7 NMSA 1978
  • Power operated Horn or Whistle capable of producing a two-second blast that is audible for at least one mile, and a Bell. 18.17.2 NMAC
  • Ventilation System, if carrying or using any flammable or toxic fluid in any enclosure for any purpose. Section 66-12-7 NMSA 1978
  • Backfire Flame Arrestor if vessel has an inboard motor. 18.17.2 NMAC
  • Engine Cut-off Switch Lanyard, attached to the operator, operator’s clothing, or operator’s PFD, if equipped. Section 66-12-11 NMSA 1978

ADDITIONAL BOATING SAFETY INFORMATION AND BOATING LAWS:

  • Do not exceed the capacity of the boat. (Count the people being towed as well as the people in the boat.)
  • Properly working lights are required to be displayed between one half-hour after sunset to one-half hour before sunrise. Section 66-12-7 NMSA 1978 and 18.17.2 NMAC.
  • Children under the age of 13 may not operate a sailboat except when under an adult’s onboard supervision. 18.17.2 NMAC.
  • Children under the age of 13 must wear their life jacket while underway except when below deck or in an enclosed cabin. 18.17.2 NMAC.
  • Persons engaged in boating on a river must wear a life jacket. 18.17.2 NMAC.
  • Persons using ice sailboats must wear a life jacket. 18.17.2 NMAC.

 

Life jackets must be approved by the U.S. Coast Guard, be in good condition, be properly sized for each person, and be readily accessible.

New Mexico State Parks recommends that all boaters take a boating safety course. A list of classes and additional on-line options can be found at BoatNM.com.

Some boating waters have local regulations more restrictive than state law. Contact each boating water for additional regulations before you boat.

All boat accidents that involve a missing person, injury beyond first aid, and/or damage greater than $100 must be reported to the local law enforcement agency and New Mexico State Parks—no exceptions!

Operators are subject to arrest for being under the influence of alcohol or drugs.

CANOE

For additional information or questions take a Boating Safety Course or contact your local New Mexico state park lake and speak with a New Mexico State Parks marine law enforcement officer.

For your canoe here is the list of legally required equipment and additional boating safety information.

LEGALLY REQUIRED EQUIPMENT:

  • Personal Flotation Device (PFD) for each person on board, in serviceable condition, and approved by the U.S. Coast Guard. (All persons on a canoe must wear a life jacket.) 18.17.2 NMAC
  • Paddle or Oar. Section 66-12-7 NMSA 1978
  • Sound Producing Device capable of producing a two-second blast that is audible for at least one-half mile, such as a horn or whistle. 18.17.2 NMAC

ADDITIONAL BOATING SAFETY INFORMATION AND BOATING LAWS:

  • Persons using canoes must wear a life jacket. 18.17.2 NMAC.
  • Vessel must be registered and numbered if a motor is attached (electric or gasoline)
  • A flashlight or other white light is required to be exhibited in sufficient time to prevent collision between one half-hour after sunset to one-half hour before sunrise. 18.17.2 NMAC.

Life jackets must be approved by the U.S. Coast Guard, be in good condition, be properly sized for each person, and be readily accessible.

New Mexico State Parks recommends that all boaters take a boating safety course. A list of classes and additional on-line options can be found at BoatNM.com.

Some boating waters have local regulations more restrictive than state law. Contact each boating water for additional regulations before you boat.

All boat accidents that involve a missing person, injury beyond first aid, and/or damage greater than $100 must be reported to the local law enforcement agency and New Mexico State Parks—no exceptions!

Operators are subject to arrest for being under the influence of alcohol or drugs.

KAYAK

For additional information or questions take a Boating Safety Course or contact your local New Mexico state park lake and speak with a New Mexico State Parks marine law enforcement officer.

For your kayak here is the list of legally required equipment and additional boating safety information.

LEGALLY REQUIRED EQUIPMENT:

  • Personal Flotation Device (PFD) for each person on board, in serviceable condition, and approved by the U.S. Coast Guard. (All persons on a kayak must wear a life jacket.) 18.17.2 NMAC
  • Paddle or Oar. Section 66-12-7 NMSA 1978
  • Sound Producing Device capable of producing a two-second blast that is audible for at least one-half mile, such as a horn or whistle. 18.17.2 NMAC

 

ADDITIONAL BOATING SAFETY INFORMATION AND BOATING LAWS:

  • Persons using kayaks must wear a life jacket. 18.17.2 NMAC.
  • Vessel must be registered and numbered if a motor is attached (electric or gasoline)
  • A flashlight or other white light is required to be exhibited in sufficient time to prevent collision between one half-hour after sunset to one-half hour before sunrise. 18.17.2 NMAC.

Life jackets must be approved by the U.S. Coast Guard, be in good condition, be properly sized for each person, and be readily accessible.

New Mexico State Parks recommends that all boaters take a boating safety course. A list of classes and additional on-line options can be found at BoatNM.com.

Some boating waters have local regulations more restrictive than state law. Contact each boating water for additional regulations before you boat.

All boat accidents that involve a missing person, injury beyond first aid, and/or damage greater than $100 must be reported to the local law enforcement agency and New Mexico State Parks—no exceptions!

Operators are subject to arrest for being under the influence of alcohol or drugs.

STAND-UP PADDLEBOARD

For additional information or questions take a Boating Safety Course or contact your local New Mexico state park lake and speak with a New Mexico State Parks marine law enforcement officer.

For your stand-up paddleboard here is the list of legally required equipment and additional boating safety information.

LEGALLY REQUIRED EQUIPMENT:

  • Personal Flotation Device (PFD) for each person on board, in serviceable condition, and approved by the U.S. Coast Guard. (All persons on a stand-up paddleboard must wear a life jacket.) 18.17.2 NMAC
  • Paddle or Oar. Section 66-12-7 NMSA 1978
  • Sound Producing Device capable of producing a two-second blast that is audible for at least one-half mile, such as a horn or whistle. 18.17.2 NMAC

ADDITIONAL BOATING SAFETY INFORMATION AND BOATING LAWS:

  • Persons using stand-up paddleboards must wear a life jacket. 18.17.2 NMAC.
  • Vessel must be registered and numbered if a motor is attached (electric or gasoline)
  • A flashlight or other white light is required to be exhibited in sufficient time to prevent collision between one half-hour after sunset to one-half hour before sunrise. 18.17.2 NMAC.

Life jackets must be approved by the U.S. Coast Guard, be in good condition, be properly sized for each person, and be readily accessible.

New Mexico State Parks recommends that all boaters take a boating safety course. A list of classes and additional on-line options can be found at BoatNM.com.

Some boating waters have local regulations more restrictive than state law. Contact each boating water for additional regulations before you boat.

All boat accidents that involve a missing person, injury beyond first aid, and/or damage greater than $100 must be reported to the local law enforcement agency and New Mexico State Parks—no exceptions!

Operators are subject to arrest for being under the influence of alcohol or drugs.

RUBBER RAFT

For additional information or questions take a Boating Safety Course or contact your local New Mexico state park lake and speak with a New Mexico State Parks marine law enforcement officer.

For your rubber raft here is the list of legally required equipment and additional boating safety information.

LEGALLY REQUIRED EQUIPMENT:

  • Personal Flotation Device (PFD) for each person on board, in serviceable condition, and approved by the U.S. Coast Guard. (All persons on a rubber raft must wear a life jacket.) 18.17.2 NMAC
  • Paddle or Oar. Section 66-12-7 NMSA 1978
  • Sound Producing Device capable of producing a two-second blast that is audible for at least one-half mile, such as a horn or whistle. 18.17.2 NMAC

ADDITIONAL BOATING SAFETY INFORMATION AND BOATING LAWS:

  • Persons using rubber rafts must wear a life jacket. 18.17.2 NMAC.
  • Vessel must be registered and numbered if a motor is attached (electric or gasoline)
  • A flashlight or other white light is required to be exhibited in sufficient time to prevent collision between one half-hour after sunset to one-half hour before sunrise. 18.17.2 NMAC.

Life jackets must be approved by the U.S. Coast Guard, be in good condition, be properly sized for each person, and be readily accessible.

New Mexico State Parks recommends that all boaters take a boating safety course. A list of classes and additional on-line options can be found at BoatNM.com.

Some boating waters have local regulations more restrictive than state law. Contact each boating water for additional regulations before you boat.

All boat accidents that involve a missing person, injury beyond first aid, and/or damage greater than $100 must be reported to the local law enforcement agency and New Mexico State Parks—no exceptions!

Operators are subject to arrest for being under the influence of alcohol or drugs.

WIND SAIL BOARD, INNER TUBE, AIR MATTRESS, FLOAT TUBE OR OTHER INFLATABLE DEVICE

For additional information or questions take a Boating Safety Course or contact your local New Mexico state park lake and speak with a New Mexico State Parks marine law enforcement officer.

For your wind sail board, inner tube, air mattress, float tube or other inflatable device here is the list of legally required equipment and additional boating safety information.

LEGALLY REQUIRED EQUIPMENT:

  • Personal Flotation Device (PFD) or Flotation Assist Device for each person on board, in serviceable condition, and approved by the U.S. Coast Guard. (All persons on a wind sail board, inner tube, air mattress, float tube or other inflatable device must wear a life jacket.) 18.17.2 NMAC
  • Throwable Personal Flotation Device, in serviceable condition, readily accessible, and approved by the U.S. Coast Guard. 18.17.2 NMAC
  • Rope of at least equal length to the vessel. Section 66-12-7 NMSA 1978
  • Paddle or Oar. Section 66-12-7 NMSA 1978
  • Bailing Bucket with a capacity of at least one gallon, or hand-operated Bilge Pump. Section 66-12-7 NMSA 1978
  • Sound Producing Device capable of producing a two-second blast that is audible for at least one-half mile, such as a horn or whistle. 18.17.2 NMAC

ADDITIONAL BOATING SAFETY INFORMATION AND BOATING LAWS:

  • Persons using wind sail boards, inner tubes, air mattresses, float tubes or other inflatable devices must wear a life jacket or flotation assist device. 18.17.2 NMAC.
  • Vessel must be registered and numbered if a motor is attached (electric or gasoline)
  • A flashlight or other white light is required to be exhibited in sufficient time to prevent collision between one half-hour after sunset to one-half hour before sunrise. 18.17.2 NMAC.

Life jackets must be approved by the U.S. Coast Guard, be in good condition, be properly sized for each person, and be readily accessible.

New Mexico State Parks recommends that all boaters take a boating safety course. A list of classes and additional on-line options can be found at BoatNM.com.

Some boating waters have local regulations more restrictive than state law. Contact each boating water for additional regulations before you boat.

All boat accidents that involve a missing person, injury beyond first aid, and/or damage greater than $100 must be reported to the local law enforcement agency and New Mexico State Parks—no exceptions!

Operators are subject to arrest for being under the influence of alcohol or drugs.